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How To Can Peaches

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If you love peaches then you must learn how to can peaches so you can enjoy them all year. They taste so fresh and just like summer without the tinny taste that store canned peaches have. Seriously finding great tasting peaches out of season is almost impossible, so taking a little time to preserve your own is so worthwhile.

Keeping preserved peaches in your pantry food storage is always handy.

They are so easy to make a quick dessert from. You can use them in pies, cobblers, crisps, fruit salads, or drained in a bowl with a little cinnamon and whipped cream on top.

For the recipe below you can use water, juice, or a sugar syrup as your liquid. There are benefits to each type.

Water is the simplest to use and gives you naturally sweet peaches without added sugar this is perfect if you are eating a low sugar diet or want the most flexibility when using your peaches later.

On the other hand, I’ve always found that peaches canned in syrup, even a light syrup hold their color and taste better over time.

Luckily when you are canning peaches or other fruits you can pick the liquid that is best for your health and how you plan to use them later.

Jar of peaches on a wooden table. Text overlay says How To Can Peaches.

How Many Peaches Do I Need?

How many peaches you need to fill your canner will vary a little depending on the size of the peaches.

Generally, you’ll need 17 1/2 pounds to fill 7-quart jars and 11 pounds to fill 9-pint jars.

How To Make A Light Syrup For Canning Peaches

You can use water or syrup to can peaches. If you decide to use water the peaches will preserve just fine but will not be as sweet tasting as you normally find canned peaches.

Using a sugar syrup will help to enhance and preserve the sweetness.

To make a light sugar syrup combine 9 cups of water and 2 1/4 cups of sugar in a heavy-bottomed pot and bring to a boil.

How To Can Peaches

1. Remove The Skins

Before you start slicing your peaches you need to remove the skins. The easiest way to do this is to blanch the peaches.

Bring a large pot of water to a boil, then dip the peaches into the boiling water for 30 to 60 seconds until the skins start to loosen.

Then remove the peaches from the hot water and place them immediately into ice-cold water. The skins will then be easy to slip off.

2. Cut

After removing the skins cut the peaches in half and remove the pit.

Cut into slices or cubes as desired or leave as halves.

As you finish cutting a peach place it into a bowl of ascorbic acid solution to keep them from turning brown as you work.

Continue until you’ve finished peeling and slicing all of your peaches.

Next pick either the raw pack or hot pack method to fill your canning jars.

3. To Raw Pack

Fill your jars with raw peaches, then cover with hot water or syrup leaving 1/2 inch of headspace.

4. To Hot Pack

Drain your fruit that has been in acidulated water and place them into a large saucepan along with enough water, syrup, or juice to fill your jars.

Bring the mixture to a boil. Then fill your mason jars with the peaches and hot liquid, leaving 1/2 inch headspace.

5. Process

Remove air bubbles by running a plastic spatula around the inside edge of the canning jars.

Then wipe the rims clean and place the lids and rings on finger tight.

Process in your water bath canner  20 minutes for pints or 25 minutes for quarts if you hot packed, for raw pack it’s 25 minutes for pints or 30 minutes for quarts, adjust according to your altitude.

When done remove the jars from the canner and place them on a towel. Let the jars sit undeserved for 24 hours to let the seals harden.

Any jars that haven’t sealed need to be reprocessed or refrigerated right away.

Freestone VS Clingstone Peaches

Freestone refers to peaches that are supposed to separate easily from the stone (pit) in the center of the fruit.

Freestone peaches are meant to be easy to slice and using in your favorite recipes or preserving.

In clingstone peaches, the flesh holds tighter to the peach pit making it harder to separate.

Either way removing the pits isn’t always an easy task. But pealing and pitting peaches is easier with fully ripe fruit.

Can You Can White Peaches?

The steps here only apply to common yellow peaches. The National Center for Home Food Preservation doesn’t recommend canning white peaches as they are lower in acid than the yellow varieties. Instead, it’s best to freeze white peaches.

Yield: 7 quarts

How To Can Peaches

2 jars of home canned peaches on a table.

Learning how to can peaches is fun and so worthwhile! Canning peaches in a water bath canner is easy and the perfect way to preserve peaches to enjoy all year long.

Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 25 minutes
Total Time 55 minutes

Ingredients

  • 17 to 18 pounds of peaches
  • 9 cups water
  • 2 1/4 cups white sugar
  • boiling water for peeling peaches
  • ascorbic acid solution

Instructions

  1. Combine water and sugar in a heavy-bottomed pot and bring to a boil. Keep warm until ready to use.
  2. Bring a large pot of water to a boil and dip your peaches into the water for 30-60 seconds until the skins loosen. Remove and place into ice water.
  3. Remove the skins and cut the peaches in half, then remove the pit.
  4. Finish cutting the peaches into slices, cubes, or leave as halves. Place peaches into cold water with lemon juice to help keep them from turning brown.

To Raw Pack

  1. Fill your jars with prepared peaches and cover with hot water or syrup leaving 1/2 inch of headspace.

To Hot Pack

Drain the peaches from the lemon water and place them into a large saucepan with enough water or syrup to fill your jars.
Bring the mixture to a boil, ladle into jars leaving 1/2 inch headspace.

Process

  1. Run a plastic spatula around the inside of the jars to remove any air bubbles.
  2. Wipe the rims clean and place the lids and rings on finger tight.
  3. Process in a water bath canner for 20 minutes for pints or 25 minutes for quarts if you hot packed, for raw pack it’s 25 minutes for pints or 30 minutes for quarts, adjust according to your altitude.
  4. After processing remove the jars from the canner and place them on a towel to sit undisturbed for 24 hours.
    Any jars that haven’t sealed will need to be refrigerated or reprocessed.

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